Class: Proc

Inherits:
Object show all
Defined in:
proc.c

Overview

Proc objects are blocks of code that have been bound to a set of local variables. Once bound, the code may be called in different contexts and still access those variables.

def gen_times(factor)
  return Proc.new {|n| n*factor }
end

times3 = gen_times(3)
times5 = gen_times(5)

times3.call(12)               #=> 36
times5.call(5)                #=> 25
times3.call(times5.call(4))   #=> 60

Class Method Summary collapse

Instance Method Summary collapse

Class Method Details

.new {|...| ... } ⇒ Proc .newProc

Creates a new Proc object, bound to the current context. Proc::new may be called without a block only within a method with an attached block, in which case that block is converted to the Proc object.

def proc_from
  Proc.new
end
proc = proc_from { "hello" }
proc.call   #=> "hello"

Overloads:

  • .new {|...| ... } ⇒ Proc

    Yields:

    • (...)

    Returns:

  • .newProc

    Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 462

static VALUE
rb_proc_s_new(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE klass)
{
    VALUE block = proc_new(klass, FALSE);

    rb_obj_call_init(block, argc, argv);
    return block;
}

Instance Method Details

#call(params, ...) ⇒ Object #[](params, ...) ⇒ Object

Invokes the block, setting the block's parameters to the values in params using something close to method calling semantics. Generates a warning if multiple values are passed to a proc that expects just one (previously this silently converted the parameters to an array). Note that prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It's a syntax sugar to hide "call".

For procs created using lambda or ->() an error is generated if the wrong number of parameters are passed to a Proc with multiple parameters. For procs created using Proc.new or Kernel.proc, extra parameters are silently discarded.

Returns the value of the last expression evaluated in the block. See also Proc#yield.

a_proc = Proc.new {|a, *b| b.collect {|i| i*a }}
a_proc.call(9, 1, 2, 3)   #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc[9, 1, 2, 3]        #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc = lambda {|a,b| a}
a_proc.call(1,2,3)

produces:

prog.rb:4:in `block in <main>': wrong number of arguments (3 for 2) (ArgumentError)
	from prog.rb:5:in `call'
	from prog.rb:5:in `<main>'

Overloads:


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# File 'proc.c', line 558

static VALUE
proc_call(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE procval)
{
    VALUE vret;
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    rb_block_t *blockptr = 0;
    rb_iseq_t *iseq;
    VALUE passed_procval;
    GetProcPtr(procval, proc);

    iseq = proc->block.iseq;
    if (BUILTIN_TYPE(iseq) == T_NODE || iseq->arg_block != -1) {
	if (rb_block_given_p()) {
	    rb_proc_t *passed_proc;
	    RB_GC_GUARD(passed_procval) = rb_block_proc();
	    GetProcPtr(passed_procval, passed_proc);
	    blockptr = &passed_proc->block;
	}
    }

    vret = rb_vm_invoke_proc(GET_THREAD(), proc, argc, argv, blockptr);
    RB_GC_GUARD(procval);
    return vret;
}

#call(params, ...) ⇒ Object #[](params, ...) ⇒ Object

Invokes the block, setting the block's parameters to the values in params using something close to method calling semantics. Generates a warning if multiple values are passed to a proc that expects just one (previously this silently converted the parameters to an array). Note that prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It's a syntax sugar to hide "call".

For procs created using lambda or ->() an error is generated if the wrong number of parameters are passed to a Proc with multiple parameters. For procs created using Proc.new or Kernel.proc, extra parameters are silently discarded.

Returns the value of the last expression evaluated in the block. See also Proc#yield.

a_proc = Proc.new {|a, *b| b.collect {|i| i*a }}
a_proc.call(9, 1, 2, 3)   #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc[9, 1, 2, 3]        #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc = lambda {|a,b| a}
a_proc.call(1,2,3)

produces:

prog.rb:4:in `block in <main>': wrong number of arguments (3 for 2) (ArgumentError)
	from prog.rb:5:in `call'
	from prog.rb:5:in `<main>'

Overloads:


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# File 'proc.c', line 558

static VALUE
proc_call(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE procval)
{
    VALUE vret;
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    rb_block_t *blockptr = 0;
    rb_iseq_t *iseq;
    VALUE passed_procval;
    GetProcPtr(procval, proc);

    iseq = proc->block.iseq;
    if (BUILTIN_TYPE(iseq) == T_NODE || iseq->arg_block != -1) {
	if (rb_block_given_p()) {
	    rb_proc_t *passed_proc;
	    RB_GC_GUARD(passed_procval) = rb_block_proc();
	    GetProcPtr(passed_procval, passed_proc);
	    blockptr = &passed_proc->block;
	}
    }

    vret = rb_vm_invoke_proc(GET_THREAD(), proc, argc, argv, blockptr);
    RB_GC_GUARD(procval);
    return vret;
}

#arityFixnum

Returns the number of arguments that would not be ignored. If the block is declared to take no arguments, returns 0. If the block is known to take exactly n arguments, returns n. If the block has optional arguments, return -n-1, where n is the number of mandatory arguments. A proc with no argument declarations is the same a block declaring || as its arguments.

proc {}.arity          #=>  0
proc {||}.arity        #=>  0
proc {|a|}.arity       #=>  1
proc {|a,b|}.arity     #=>  2
proc {|a,b,c|}.arity   #=>  3
proc {|*a|}.arity      #=> -1
proc {|a,*b|}.arity    #=> -2
proc {|a,*b, c|}.arity #=> -3

proc   { |x = 0| }.arity       #=> 0
lambda { |a = 0| }.arity       #=> -1
proc   { |x=0, y| }.arity      #=> 0
lambda { |x=0, y| }.arity      #=> -2
proc   { |x=0, y=0| }.arity    #=> 0
lambda { |x=0, y=0| }.arity    #=> -1
proc   { |x, y=0| }.arity      #=> 1
lambda { |x, y=0| }.arity      #=> -2
proc   { |(x, y), z=0| }.arity #=> 1
lambda { |(x, y), z=0| }.arity #=> -2

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 662

static VALUE
proc_arity(VALUE self)
{
    int arity = rb_proc_arity(self);
    return INT2FIX(arity);
}

#bindingBinding

Returns the binding associated with prc. Note that Kernel#eval accepts either a Proc or a Binding object as its second parameter.

def fred(param)
  proc {}
end

b = fred(99)
eval("param", b.binding)   #=> 99

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 2086

static VALUE
proc_binding(VALUE self)
{
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    VALUE bindval;
    rb_binding_t *bind;

    GetProcPtr(self, proc);
    if (RB_TYPE_P((VALUE)proc->block.iseq, T_NODE)) {
	if (!IS_METHOD_PROC_NODE((NODE *)proc->block.iseq)) {
	    rb_raise(rb_eArgError, "Can't create Binding from C level Proc");
	}
    }

    bindval = binding_alloc(rb_cBinding);
    GetBindingPtr(bindval, bind);
    bind->env = proc->envval;
    if (RUBY_VM_NORMAL_ISEQ_P(proc->block.iseq)) {
	bind->path = proc->block.iseq->location.path;
	bind->first_lineno = rb_iseq_first_lineno(proc->block.iseq);
    }
    else {
	bind->path = Qnil;
	bind->first_lineno = 0;
    }
    return bindval;
}

#call(params, ...) ⇒ Object #[](params, ...) ⇒ Object

Invokes the block, setting the block's parameters to the values in params using something close to method calling semantics. Generates a warning if multiple values are passed to a proc that expects just one (previously this silently converted the parameters to an array). Note that prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It's a syntax sugar to hide "call".

For procs created using lambda or ->() an error is generated if the wrong number of parameters are passed to a Proc with multiple parameters. For procs created using Proc.new or Kernel.proc, extra parameters are silently discarded.

Returns the value of the last expression evaluated in the block. See also Proc#yield.

a_proc = Proc.new {|a, *b| b.collect {|i| i*a }}
a_proc.call(9, 1, 2, 3)   #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc[9, 1, 2, 3]        #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc = lambda {|a,b| a}
a_proc.call(1,2,3)

produces:

prog.rb:4:in `block in <main>': wrong number of arguments (3 for 2) (ArgumentError)
	from prog.rb:5:in `call'
	from prog.rb:5:in `<main>'

Overloads:


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# File 'proc.c', line 558

static VALUE
proc_call(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE procval)
{
    VALUE vret;
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    rb_block_t *blockptr = 0;
    rb_iseq_t *iseq;
    VALUE passed_procval;
    GetProcPtr(procval, proc);

    iseq = proc->block.iseq;
    if (BUILTIN_TYPE(iseq) == T_NODE || iseq->arg_block != -1) {
	if (rb_block_given_p()) {
	    rb_proc_t *passed_proc;
	    RB_GC_GUARD(passed_procval) = rb_block_proc();
	    GetProcPtr(passed_procval, passed_proc);
	    blockptr = &passed_proc->block;
	}
    }

    vret = rb_vm_invoke_proc(GET_THREAD(), proc, argc, argv, blockptr);
    RB_GC_GUARD(procval);
    return vret;
}

#cloneObject

:nodoc:


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# File 'proc.c', line 121

static VALUE
proc_clone(VALUE self)
{
    VALUE procval = proc_dup(self);
    CLONESETUP(procval, self);
    return procval;
}

#curryProc #curry(arity) ⇒ Proc

Returns a curried proc. If the optional arity argument is given, it determines the number of arguments. A curried proc receives some arguments. If a sufficient number of arguments are supplied, it passes the supplied arguments to the original proc and returns the result. Otherwise, returns another curried proc that takes the rest of arguments.

b = proc {|x, y, z| (x||0) + (y||0) + (z||0) }
p b.curry[1][2][3]           #=> 6
p b.curry[1, 2][3, 4]        #=> 6
p b.curry(5)[1][2][3][4][5]  #=> 6
p b.curry(5)[1, 2][3, 4][5]  #=> 6
p b.curry(1)[1]              #=> 1

b = proc {|x, y, z, *w| (x||0) + (y||0) + (z||0) + w.inject(0, &:+) }
p b.curry[1][2][3]           #=> 6
p b.curry[1, 2][3, 4]        #=> 10
p b.curry(5)[1][2][3][4][5]  #=> 15
p b.curry(5)[1, 2][3, 4][5]  #=> 15
p b.curry(1)[1]              #=> 1

b = lambda {|x, y, z| (x||0) + (y||0) + (z||0) }
p b.curry[1][2][3]           #=> 6
p b.curry[1, 2][3, 4]        #=> wrong number of arguments (4 for 3)
p b.curry(5)                 #=> wrong number of arguments (5 for 3)
p b.curry(1)                 #=> wrong number of arguments (1 for 3)

b = lambda {|x, y, z, *w| (x||0) + (y||0) + (z||0) + w.inject(0, &:+) }
p b.curry[1][2][3]           #=> 6
p b.curry[1, 2][3, 4]        #=> 10
p b.curry(5)[1][2][3][4][5]  #=> 15
p b.curry(5)[1, 2][3, 4][5]  #=> 15
p b.curry(1)                 #=> wrong number of arguments (1 for 3)

b = proc { :foo }
p b.curry[]                  #=> :foo

Overloads:


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# File 'proc.c', line 2199

static VALUE
proc_curry(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE self)
{
    int sarity, max_arity, min_arity = rb_proc_min_max_arity(self, &max_arity);
    VALUE arity;

    rb_scan_args(argc, argv, "01", &arity);
    if (NIL_P(arity)) {
	arity = INT2FIX(min_arity);
    }
    else {
	sarity = FIX2INT(arity);
	if (rb_proc_lambda_p(self)) {
	    rb_check_arity(sarity, min_arity, max_arity);
	}
    }

    return make_curry_proc(self, rb_ary_new(), arity);
}

#dupObject

:nodoc:


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# File 'proc.c', line 102

static VALUE
proc_dup(VALUE self)
{
    VALUE procval = rb_proc_alloc(rb_cProc);
    rb_proc_t *src, *dst;
    GetProcPtr(self, src);
    GetProcPtr(procval, dst);

    dst->block = src->block;
    dst->block.proc = procval;
    dst->blockprocval = src->blockprocval;
    dst->envval = src->envval;
    dst->safe_level = src->safe_level;
    dst->is_lambda = src->is_lambda;

    return procval;
}

#hashInteger

Returns a hash value corresponding to proc body.

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 826

static VALUE
proc_hash(VALUE self)
{
    st_index_t hash;
    hash = rb_hash_start(0);
    hash = rb_hash_proc(hash, self);
    hash = rb_hash_end(hash);
    return LONG2FIX(hash);
}

#lambda?Boolean

Returns true for a Proc object for which argument handling is rigid. Such procs are typically generated by lambda.

A Proc object generated by proc ignores extra arguments.

proc {|a,b| [a,b] }.call(1,2,3)    #=> [1,2]

It provides nil for missing arguments.

proc {|a,b| [a,b] }.call(1)        #=> [1,nil]

It expands a single array argument.

proc {|a,b| [a,b] }.call([1,2])    #=> [1,2]

A Proc object generated by lambda doesn't have such tricks.

lambda {|a,b| [a,b] }.call(1,2,3)  #=> ArgumentError
lambda {|a,b| [a,b] }.call(1)      #=> ArgumentError
lambda {|a,b| [a,b] }.call([1,2])  #=> ArgumentError

Proc#lambda? is a predicate for the tricks. It returns true if no tricks apply.

lambda {}.lambda?            #=> true
proc {}.lambda?              #=> false

Proc.new is the same as proc.

Proc.new {}.lambda?          #=> false

lambda, proc and Proc.new preserve the tricks of a Proc object given by & argument.

lambda(&lambda {}).lambda?   #=> true
proc(&lambda {}).lambda?     #=> true
Proc.new(&lambda {}).lambda? #=> true

lambda(&proc {}).lambda?     #=> false
proc(&proc {}).lambda?       #=> false
Proc.new(&proc {}).lambda?   #=> false

A Proc object generated by & argument has the tricks

def n(&b) b.lambda? end
n {}                         #=> false

The & argument preserves the tricks if a Proc object is given by & argument.

n(&lambda {})                #=> true
n(&proc {})                  #=> false
n(&Proc.new {})              #=> false

A Proc object converted from a method has no tricks.

def m() end
method(:m).to_proc.lambda?   #=> true

n(&method(:m))               #=> true
n(&method(:m).to_proc)       #=> true

define_method is treated the same as method definition. The defined method has no tricks.

class C
  define_method(:d) {}
end
C.new.d(1,2)       #=> ArgumentError
C.new.method(:d).to_proc.lambda?   #=> true

define_method always defines a method without the tricks, even if a non-lambda Proc object is given. This is the only exception for which the tricks are not preserved.

class C
  define_method(:e, &proc {})
end
C.new.e(1,2)       #=> ArgumentError
C.new.method(:e).to_proc.lambda?   #=> true

This exception insures that methods never have tricks and makes it easy to have wrappers to define methods that behave as usual.

class C
  def self.def2(name, &body)
    define_method(name, &body)
  end

  def2(:f) {}
end
C.new.f(1,2)       #=> ArgumentError

The wrapper def2 defines a method which has no tricks.

Returns:

  • (Boolean)

Returns:

  • (Boolean)

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# File 'proc.c', line 230

VALUE
rb_proc_lambda_p(VALUE procval)
{
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    GetProcPtr(procval, proc);

    return proc->is_lambda ? Qtrue : Qfalse;
}

#parametersArray

Returns the parameter information of this proc.

prc = lambda{|x, y=42, *other|}
prc.parameters  #=> [[:req, :x], [:opt, :y], [:rest, :other]]

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 798

static VALUE
rb_proc_parameters(VALUE self)
{
    int is_proc;
    rb_iseq_t *iseq = get_proc_iseq(self, &is_proc);
    if (!iseq) {
	return unnamed_parameters(rb_proc_arity(self));
    }
    return rb_iseq_parameters(iseq, is_proc);
}

#source_locationArray, Fixnum

Returns the Ruby source filename and line number containing this proc or nil if this proc was not defined in Ruby (i.e. native)

Returns ].

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 763

VALUE
rb_proc_location(VALUE self)
{
    return iseq_location(get_proc_iseq(self, 0));
}

#to_procProc

Part of the protocol for converting objects to Proc objects. Instances of class Proc simply return themselves.

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 887

static VALUE
proc_to_proc(VALUE self)
{
    return self;
}

#to_sString Also known as: inspect

Returns the unique identifier for this proc, along with an indication of where the proc was defined.

Returns:


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# File 'proc.c', line 844

static VALUE
proc_to_s(VALUE self)
{
    VALUE str = 0;
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    const char *cname = rb_obj_classname(self);
    rb_iseq_t *iseq;
    const char *is_lambda;

    GetProcPtr(self, proc);
    iseq = proc->block.iseq;
    is_lambda = proc->is_lambda ? " (lambda)" : "";

    if (RUBY_VM_NORMAL_ISEQ_P(iseq)) {
	int first_lineno = 0;

	if (iseq->line_info_table) {
	    first_lineno = rb_iseq_first_lineno(iseq);
	}
	str = rb_sprintf("#<%s:%[email protected]%s:%d%s>", cname, (void *)self,
			 RSTRING_PTR(iseq->location.path),
			 first_lineno, is_lambda);
    }
    else {
	str = rb_sprintf("#<%s:%p%s>", cname, (void *)proc->block.iseq,
			 is_lambda);
    }

    if (OBJ_TAINTED(self)) {
	OBJ_TAINT(str);
    }
    return str;
}

#call(params, ...) ⇒ Object #[](params, ...) ⇒ Object

Invokes the block, setting the block's parameters to the values in params using something close to method calling semantics. Generates a warning if multiple values are passed to a proc that expects just one (previously this silently converted the parameters to an array). Note that prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It's a syntax sugar to hide "call".

For procs created using lambda or ->() an error is generated if the wrong number of parameters are passed to a Proc with multiple parameters. For procs created using Proc.new or Kernel.proc, extra parameters are silently discarded.

Returns the value of the last expression evaluated in the block. See also Proc#yield.

a_proc = Proc.new {|a, *b| b.collect {|i| i*a }}
a_proc.call(9, 1, 2, 3)   #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc[9, 1, 2, 3]        #=> [9, 18, 27]
a_proc = lambda {|a,b| a}
a_proc.call(1,2,3)

produces:

prog.rb:4:in `block in <main>': wrong number of arguments (3 for 2) (ArgumentError)
	from prog.rb:5:in `call'
	from prog.rb:5:in `<main>'

Overloads:


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# File 'proc.c', line 558

static VALUE
proc_call(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE procval)
{
    VALUE vret;
    rb_proc_t *proc;
    rb_block_t *blockptr = 0;
    rb_iseq_t *iseq;
    VALUE passed_procval;
    GetProcPtr(procval, proc);

    iseq = proc->block.iseq;
    if (BUILTIN_TYPE(iseq) == T_NODE || iseq->arg_block != -1) {
	if (rb_block_given_p()) {
	    rb_proc_t *passed_proc;
	    RB_GC_GUARD(passed_procval) = rb_block_proc();
	    GetProcPtr(passed_procval, passed_proc);
	    blockptr = &passed_proc->block;
	}
    }

    vret = rb_vm_invoke_proc(GET_THREAD(), proc, argc, argv, blockptr);
    RB_GC_GUARD(procval);
    return vret;
}