CsvRowModel Build Status Code Climate Test Coverage

Import and export your custom CSVs with a intuitive shared Ruby interface.

First define your schema:

class ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Model

  column :id, options
  column :name

  merge_options :id, more_options # optional
end

To export, define your export model like ActiveModel::Serializer and generate the file:

class ProjectExportRowModel < ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Export

  # this is an override with the default implementation
  def id
    source_model.id
  end
end

export_file = CsvRowModel::Export::File.new(ProjectExportRowModel)
export_file.generate { |csv| csv << project } # `project` is the `source_model` in `ProjectExportRowModel`
export_file.file # => <Tempfile>
export_file.to_s # => export_file.file.read

To import, define your import model, which works like ActiveRecord, and iterate through a file:

class ProjectImportRowModel < ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  # this is an override with the default implementation
  def id
    original_attribute(:id)
  end
end

import_file = CsvRowModel::Import::File.new(file_path, ProjectImportRowModel)
row_model = import_file.next

row_model.headers # => ["id", "name"]

row_model.source_row # => ["1", "Some Project Name"]
row_model.source_attributes # => { id: "1", name: "Some Project Name" }, this is `source_row` mapped to `column_names`
row_model.attributes # => { id: "1", name: "Some Project Name" }, this is final attribute values mapped to `column_names`

row_model.id # => 1
row_model.name # => "Some Project Name"

row_model.previous # => <ProjectImportRowModel instance>
row_model.previous.previous # => nil, save memory by avoiding a linked list

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'csv_row_model'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install csv_row_model

Export

Header Value

To generate a header value, the following pseudocode is executed:

def header(column_name)
  # 1. Header Option
  header = options_for(column_name)[:header]

  # 2. format_header
  header || format_header(column_name, context)
end

Header Option

Specify the header manually:

class ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Model
  column :name, header: "NAME"
end

Format Header

Override the format_header method to format column header names:

class ProjectExportRowModel < ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Export
  class << self
    def format_header(column_name, context)
      column_name.to_s.titleize
    end
  end
end

Import

Attribute Values

To generate a attribute value, the following pseudocode is executed:

def original_attribute(column_name)
  # 1. Get the raw CSV string value for the column
  value = source_attributes[column_name]

  # 2. Clean or format each cell
  value = self.class.format_cell(cell, column_name, context)

  if value.present?
    # 3a. Parse the cell value (which does nothing if no parsing is specified)
    parse(value)
  elsif default_exists?
    # 3b. Set the default
    default_for_column(column_name)
  end
end

def original_attributes; { id: original_attribute(:id) } end
def id; original_attribute(:id) end

Format Cell

Override the format_cell method to clean/format every cell:

class ProjectImportRowModel < ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import
  class << self
    def format_cell(cell, column_name, context)
      cell = cell.strip
      cell.blank? ? nil : cell
    end
  end
end

Type

Automatic type parsing.

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  column :id, type: Integer
  column :name, parse: ->(original_string) { parse(original_string) }

  def parse(original_string)
    "#{id} - #{original_string}"
  end
end

There are validators for available types: Boolean, Date, DateTime, Float, Integer. See Type Format for more. You can also customize and create new types via a override:

class ProjectImportRowModel
  # GOTCHA: this should be defined before `::column` is called,
  # as `::column` uses this to check passed `:type` option (and return ArgumentError)
  def self.class_to_parse_lambda
    super.merge(
      Hash => ->(s) { JSON.parse(s) },
      'CommaList' => ->(s) { s.split(",").map(&:strip) }
    )
  end
end

Default

Sets the default value of the cell:

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  column :id, default: 1
  column :name, default: -> { get_name }

  def get_name; "John Doe" end
end
row_model = ProjectImportRowModel.new(["", ""])
row_model.id # => 1
row_model.name # => "John Doe"
row_model.default_changes # => { id: ["", 1], name: ["", "John Doe"] }

DefaultChangeValidator is provided to allows to add warnings when defaults are set. See Default Changes for more.

Validations

ActiveModel::Validations and ActiveWarnings are included for errors and warnings.

There are layers to validations.

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  # Errors - by default, an Error will make the row skip
  validates :id, numericality: { greater_than: 0 } # ActiveModel::Validations

  # Warnings - a message you want the user to see, but will not make the row skip
  warnings do # ActiveWarnings, see: https://github.com/s12chung/active_warnings
    validates :some_custom_string, presence: true
  end

  # This is for validation of the strings before parsing. See: https://github.com/FinalCAD/csv_row_model#parsedmodel
  parsed_model do
    validates :id, presence: true
    # can do warnings too
  end
end

Type Format

Notice that there are validators given for different types: Boolean, Date, DateTime, Float, Integer:

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  column :id, type: Integer, validate_type: true

  # the :validate_type option is the same as:
  # parsed_model do
  #   validates :id, integer_format: true, allow_blank: true
  # end
end

ProjectRowModel.new(["not_a_number"])
row_model.valid? # => false
row_model.errors.full_messages # => ["Id is not a Integer format"]

The above uses IntegerFormatValidator internally, you may customize this class or create new validators for custom types.

Default Changes

A custom validator for Default Changes.

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Input

  column :id, default: 1
  validates :id, default_change: true
end

row_model = ProjectImportRowModel.new([""])

row_model.valid? # => false
row_model.errors.full_messages # => ["Id changed by default"]
row_model.default_changes # => { id: ["", 1] }

Skip and Abort

You can iterate through a file with the #each method, which calls #next internally. #next will always return the next RowModel in the file. However, you can implement skips and abort logic:

class ProjectImportRowModel
  # always skip
  def skip?
    true # original implementation: !valid?
  end
end

import_file = CsvRowModel::Import::File.new(file_path, ProjectImportRowModel)
import_file.each { |project_import_model| puts "does not yield here" }
import_file.next # does not skip or abort

File Validations

You can also have file validations, while will make the entire import process abort. Currently, there is one provided validation.

class ImportFile < CsvRowModel::Import::File
  validate :headers_invalid_row # checks if header is valid CSV syntax
  validate :headers_count # calls #headers_invalid_row, then check the count. will ignore tailing empty headers
end

Can't be used for File Model schemas.

Import Callbacks

CsvRowModel::Import::File can be subclassed to access ActiveModel::Callbacks.

  • each_iteration - before, around, or after the an iteration on #each. Use this to handle exceptions. return and break may be called within the callback for skips and aborts.
  • next - before, around, or after each change in current_row_model
  • skip - before
  • abort - before

and implement the callbacks:

class ImportFile < CsvRowModel::Import::File
  around_each_iteration :logger_track
  before_skip :track_skip

  def logger_track(&block)
    ...
  end

  def track_skip
    ...
  end
end

Advanced Import

ParsedModel

The ParsedModel represents a row BEFORE parsing to add validations.

class ProjectImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  # Note the type definition here for parsing
  column :id, type: Integer

  # this is applied to the parsed CSV on the model
  validates :id, numericality: { greater_than: 0 }

  parsed_model do
    # define your parsed_model here

    # this is applied BEFORE the parsed CSV on parsed_model
    validates :id, presence: true

    def random_method; "Hihi" end
  end
end

# Applied to the String
ProjectImportRowModel.new([""])
parsed_model = row_model.parsed_model
parsed_model.random_method => "Hihi"
parsed_model.valid? => false
parsed_model.errors.full_messages # => ["Id can't be blank'"]

# Errors are propagated for simplicity
row_model.valid? # => false
row_model.errors.full_messages # => ["Id can't be blank'"]

# Applied to the parsed Integer
row_model = ProjectRowModel.new(["-1"])
row_model.valid? # => false
row_model.errors.full_messages # => ["Id must be greater than 0"]

Note that ParsedModel validations are calculated after Format Attribute and custom validators can't be autoloaded---non-reloadable classes can't access reloadable ones.

Represents

A CSV is often a representation of database model(s), much like how JSON parameters represents models in requests. However, CSVs schemas are flat and static and JSON parameters are tree structured and dynamic (but often static). Because CSVs are flat, RowModels are also flat, but they can represent various models. The represents interface attempts to simplify this for importing.

class ProjectImportRowModel < ProjectRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  # this is shorthand for the psuedo_code:
  # def project
  #  return if id.blank? || name.blank?
  #
  #  # turn off memoziation with `memoize: false` option
  #  @project ||= __the_code_inside_the_block__
  # end
  #
  # and the psuedo_code:
  # def valid?
  #   super # calls ActiveModel::Errors code
  #   errors.delete(:project) if id.invalid? || name.invalid?
  #   errors.empty?
  # end
  represents_one :project, dependencies: [:id, :name] do
     project = Project.where(id: id).first

     # project not found, invalid.
     return unless project

     project.name = name
     project
   end

   # same as above, but: returns [] if name.blank?
   represents_many :projects, dependencies: [:name] do
     Project.where(name: name)
   end
end

# Importing is the same
import_file = CsvRowModel::Import::File.new(file_path, ProjectImportRowModel)
row_model = import_file.next
row_model.project.name # => "Some Project Name"

The represents_one method defines a dynamic #project method that:

  1. Memoizes by default, turn off with memoize: false option
  2. Handles dependencies:
    • When any of the dependencies are blank?, the attribute block is not called and the representation returns nil.
    • When any of the dependencies are invalid?, row_model.errors for dependencies are cleaned. For the example above, if id/name are invalid?, then the :project key is removed from the errors, so: row_model.errors.keys # => [:id, :name] (applies to warnings as well)

represents_many is also available, except it returns [] when any of the dependencies are blank?.

Children

Child RowModel relationships can also be defined:

class UserImportRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  column :id, type: Integer
  column :name
  column :email

  # uses ProjectImportRowModel#valid? to detect the child row
  has_many :projects, ProjectImportRowModel
end

import_file = CsvRowModel::Import::File.new(file_path, UserImportRowModel)
row_model = import_file.next
row_model.projects # => [<ProjectImportRowModel>, ...]

Dynamic Columns

Dynamic columns are columns that can expand to many columns. Currently, we can only one dynamic column after all other standard columns. The following:

class DynamicColumnModel
  include CsvRowModel::Model

  column :first_name
  column :last_name
  # header is optional, below is the default_implementation
  dynamic_column :skills, header: ->(skill_name) { skill_name }, header_models_context_key: :skills
end

represents this table:

first_name last_name skill1 skill2
John Doe No Yes
Mario Super Yes No
Mike Jackson Yes Yes

The format_dynamic_column_header(header_model, column_name, context) can be used to defined like format_header. Defined in both import and export due to headers being used for both.

Export

Dynamic column attributes are arrays, but each item in the array is defined via singular attribute method like normal columns:

class DynamicColumnExportModel < DynamicColumnModel
  include CsvRowModel::Export

  def skill(skill_name)
    # below is an override, this is the default implementation: skill_name # => "skill1", then "skill2"
    source_model.skills.include?(skill_name) ? "Yes" : "No"
  end
end

# `skills` in the context is used as the header, which is used in `def skill(skill_name)` above
# to change this context key, use the :header_models_context_key option
export_file = CsvRowModel::Export::File.new(DynamicColumnExportModel, { skills: Skill.all  })
export_file.generate do |csv|
  User.all.each { |user| csv << user }
end

Import

Like Export above, each item of the array is defined via singular attribute method like normal columns:

class DynamicColumnImportModel < DynamicColumnModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import

  # this is an override with the default implementation (override highly recommended)
  def skill(value, skill_name)
    value
  end

  class << self
    # Clean/format every dynamic_column attribute array
    #
    # this is an override with the default implementation
    def format_dynamic_column_cells(cells, column_name, context)
      cells
    end
  end
end
row_model = CsvRowModel::Import::File.new(file_path, DynamicColumnImportModel).next
row_model.attributes # => { first_name: "John", last_name: "Doe", skills: ['No', 'Yes'] }
row_model.skills # => ['No', 'Yes']

File Model

A File Model is a RowModel where the row represents the entire file. It looks like this:

id 1
name abc
class FileRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Model
  include CsvRowModel::Model::FileModel

  row :id
  row :name
end

The :header option is not available. It is a unfinished/unpolished API, so things may change.

Import

For File Model Import, the headers are matched via regex and the value is the cell to right of the header. When defining the schema, the order of the row calls do not matter.

class FileImportModel < FileRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Import
  include CsvRowModel::Import::FileModel
end

Export

For File Model Export, you have to define a template, where you fill in the values of each cell. Symbol values will match the row's header.

class FileExportModel < FileRowModel
  include CsvRowModel::Export
  include CsvRowModel::Export::FileModel

  def rows_template
    @rows_template ||= begin
      [
        [:id, id],
        ['', :name, name]
      ]
    end
  end

  def name
    source_model.name.upcase
  end
end