TTY

Build Status Code Climate

Toolbox for developing CLI clients in Ruby. This library provides a fluid interface for working with terminals.

Features

Jump-start development of your command line app:

  • Fully customizable table rendering with an easy-to-use API. (status: In Progress)
  • Terminal output colorization. (status: DONE)
  • Terminal & System detection utilities. (status: In Progress)
  • Text alignment/padding/indentation. (status: In Progress)
  • Shell user interface. (status: In Progress)
  • File diffs. (status: TODO)
  • Progress bar. (status: TODO)
  • Configuration file management. (status: TODO)
  • Fully tested with major ruby interpreters.
  • No dependencies to allow for easy gem vendoring.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'tty'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install tty

Usage

Table

To instantiate table pass 2-dimensional array:

  table = TTY::Table[['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
  table = TTY::Table.new [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
  table = TTY::Table.new rows: [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

  table = TTY::Table.new ['h1', 'h2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
  table = TTY::Table.new header: ['h1', 'h2'], rows: [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

or cross header with rows inside a hash like so

  table = TTY::Table.new [{'h1' => ['a1', 'a2'], 'h2' => ['b1', 'b2']}]

Apart from rows and header, you can provide other customization options such as

  column_widths   # array of maximum columns widths
  column_aligns   # array of cell alignments out of :left, :center and :right
  renderer        # enforce display type out of :basic, :color, :unicode, :ascii
  orientation     # either :horizontal or :vertical

Table behaves like an Array so <<, each and familiar methods can be used

  table << ['a1', 'a2', 'a3']
  table << ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']
  table << ['a1', 'a2'] << ['b1', 'b2']  # chain rows assignment

  table.each { |row| ... }  # iterate over rows
  table[i, j]               # return element at row(i) and column(j)
  table.row(i) { ... }      # return array for row(i)
  table.column(j) { ... }   # return array for column(j)
  table.row_size            # return row size
  table.column_size         # return column size
  table.size                # return an array of [row_size, column_size]

or pass your rows in a block

  table = TTY::Table.new  do |t|
    t << ['a1', 'a2', 'a3']
    t << ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']
  end

And then to print do

  table.to_s

  a1  a2  a3
  b1  b2  b3

To print border around data table you need to specify renderer type out of basic, ascii, unicode. For instance to output unicode border:

  table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2'], renderer: 'unicode'
  table.to_s

  ┌───────┬───────┐
  │header1│header2│
  ├───────┼───────┤
  │a1     │a2     │
  │b1     │b2     │
  └───────┴───────┘

You can also create your own custom border by subclassing TTY::Table::Border

  class MyBorder < TTY::Table::Border
    def_border do
      {
        'bottom'       => ' ',
        'bottom_mid'   => '*',
        'bottom_left'  => '*',
        'bottom_right' => '*',
        'left'         => '$',
        'right'        => '$'
      }
    end
  end

Next pass the border to your table

  table.renders_with MyBorder

Terminal

To read general terminal properties you can use on of the helpers

  term = TTY::Terminal.new
  term.width              # => 140
  term.height             # =>  60
  term.color?             # => true or false
  term.echo(false) { }    # switch off echo for the block

To colorize your output do

  term.color.set 'text...', :bold, :red, :on_green    # => red bold text on green background
  term.color.remove 'text...'       # strips off ansi escape sequences
  term.color.code :red              # ansi escape code for the supplied color

Shell

Main responsibility is to interact with the prompt and provide convenience methods.

Available methods are

  shell = TTY::Shell.new
  shell.ask          # print question
  shell.read         # read from stdin
  shell.say          # print message to stdout
  shell.confirm      # print message(s) in green
  shell.warn         # print message(s) in yellow
  shell.error        # print message(s) in red
  shell.print_table  # print table to stdout

In order to ask question and parse answers:

  shell  = TTY::Shell.new
  answer = shell.ask("What is your name?").read_string

The library provides small DSL to help with parsing and asking precise questions

  argument    # :required or :optional
  character   # turn character based input, otherwise line (default: false)
  clean       # reset question
  default     # default value used if none is provided
  echo        # turn echo on and off (default: true)
  mask        # mask characters i.e '****' (default: false)
  modify      # apply answer modification :upcase, :downcase, :trim, :chomp etc..
  range       # specify range '0-9', '0..9', '0...9' or negative '-1..-9'
  validate    # regex against which stdin input is checked
  valid       # a list of expected valid options

You can chain question methods or configure them inside a block

  shell.ask("What is your name?").argument(:required).default('Piotr').validate(/\w+\s\w+/).read_string

  shell.ask "What is your name?" do
    argument :required
    default  'Piotr'
    validate /\w+\s\w+/
    valid    ['Piotr', 'Piotrek']
    modify   :capitalize
  end.read_string

Reading answers and converting them into required types can be done with custom readers

  read_bool       # return true or false for strings such as "Yes", "No"
  read_date       # return date type
  read_datetime   # return datetime type
  read_email      # validate answer against email regex
  read_float      # return decimal or error if cannot convert
  read_int        # return integer or error if cannot convert
  read_multiple   # return multiple line string
  read_password   # return string with echo turned off
  read_range      # return range type
  read_string     # return string

For example, if we wanted to ask a user for a single digit in given range

  ask("Provide number in range: 0-9") do
    range '0-9'
    on_error :retry
  end.read_int

on the other hand, if we are interested in range answer then

  ask("Provide range of numbers?").read_range

System

  TTY::System.unix?      # => true
  TTY::System.windows?   # => false

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Copyright

Copyright (c) 2012-2013 Piotr Murach. See LICENSE for further details.