Class: BasicObject

Defined in:
class.c

Direct Known Subclasses

Object

Instance Method Summary collapse

Constructor Details

#new(*args) ⇒ Object

Returns a new BasicObject. Arguments are ignored.



# File 'object.c'

/*
 * Not documented
 */

static VALUE
rb_obj_dummy(void)
{
    return Qnil;
}

Dynamic Method Handling

This class handles dynamic methods through the method_missing method

#method_missing(symbol[, *args]) ⇒ Object

Invoked by Ruby when obj is sent a message it cannot handle. symbol is the symbol for the method called, and args are any arguments that were passed to it. By default, the interpreter raises an error when this method is called. However, it is possible to override the method to provide more dynamic behavior. If it is decided that a particular method should not be handled, then super should be called, so that ancestors can pick up the missing method. The example below creates a class Roman, which responds to methods with names consisting of roman numerals, returning the corresponding integer values.

class Roman
  def romanToInt(str)
    # ...
  end
  def method_missing(methId)
    str = methId.id2name
    romanToInt(str)
  end
end

r = Roman.new
r.iv      #=> 4
r.xxiii   #=> 23
r.mm      #=> 2000


# File 'vm_eval.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj.method_missing(symbol [, *args] )   -> result
 *
 *  Invoked by Ruby when <i>obj</i> is sent a message it cannot handle.
 *  <i>symbol</i> is the symbol for the method called, and <i>args</i>
 *  are any arguments that were passed to it. By default, the interpreter
 *  raises an error when this method is called. However, it is possible
 *  to override the method to provide more dynamic behavior.
 *  If it is decided that a particular method should not be handled, then
 *  <i>super</i> should be called, so that ancestors can pick up the
 *  missing method.
 *  The example below creates
 *  a class <code>Roman</code>, which responds to methods with names
 *  consisting of roman numerals, returning the corresponding integer
 *  values.
 *
 *     class Roman
 *       def romanToInt(str)
 *         # ...
 *       end
 *       def method_missing(methId)
 *         str = methId.id2name
 *         romanToInt(str)
 *       end
 *     end
 *
 *     r = Roman.new
 *     r.iv      #=> 4
 *     r.xxiii   #=> 23
 *     r.mm      #=> 2000
 */

static VALUE
rb_method_missing(int argc, const VALUE *argv, VALUE obj)
{
    rb_thread_t *th = GET_THREAD();
    raise_method_missing(th, argc, argv, obj, th->method_missing_reason);
    return Qnil;        /* not reached */
}

Instance Method Details

#!Object

Boolean negate.



# File 'object.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     !obj    -> true or false
 *
 *  Boolean negate.
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_not(VALUE obj)
{
    return RTEST(obj) ? Qfalse : Qtrue;
}

#!=Object

Returns true if two objects are not-equal, otherwise false.



# File 'object.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj != other        -> true or false
 *
 *  Returns true if two objects are not-equal, otherwise false.
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_not_equal(VALUE obj1, VALUE obj2)
{
    VALUE result = rb_funcall(obj1, id_eq, 1, obj2);
    return RTEST(result) ? Qfalse : Qtrue;
}

#==(other) ⇒ Boolean #equal?(other) ⇒ Boolean #eql?(other) ⇒ Boolean

Equality---At the Object level, == returns true only if obj and other are the same object. Typically, this method is overridden in descendant classes to provide class-specific meaning.

Unlike ==, the equal? method should never be overridden by subclasses: it is used to determine object identity (that is, a.equal?(b) iff a is the same object as b).

The eql? method returns true if obj and anObject have the same value. Used by Hash to test members for equality. For objects of class Object, eql? is synonymous with ==. Subclasses normally continue this tradition, but there are exceptions. Numeric types, for example, perform type conversion across ==, but not across eql?, so:

1 == 1.0     #=> true
1.eql? 1.0   #=> false


# File 'object.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj == other        -> true or false
 *     obj.equal?(other)   -> true or false
 *     obj.eql?(other)     -> true or false
 *
 *  Equality---At the <code>Object</code> level, <code>==</code> returns
 *  <code>true</code> only if <i>obj</i> and <i>other</i> are the
 *  same object. Typically, this method is overridden in descendant
 *  classes to provide class-specific meaning.
 *
 *  Unlike <code>==</code>, the <code>equal?</code> method should never be
 *  overridden by subclasses: it is used to determine object identity
 *  (that is, <code>a.equal?(b)</code> iff <code>a</code> is the same
 *  object as <code>b</code>).
 *
 *  The <code>eql?</code> method returns <code>true</code> if
 *  <i>obj</i> and <i>anObject</i> have the same value. Used by
 *  <code>Hash</code> to test members for equality.  For objects of
 *  class <code>Object</code>, <code>eql?</code> is synonymous with
 *  <code>==</code>. Subclasses normally continue this tradition, but
 *  there are exceptions. <code>Numeric</code> types, for example,
 *  perform type conversion across <code>==</code>, but not across
 *  <code>eql?</code>, so:
 *
 *     1 == 1.0     #=> true
 *     1.eql? 1.0   #=> false
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_equal(VALUE obj1, VALUE obj2)
{
    if (obj1 == obj2) return Qtrue;
    return Qfalse;
}

#send(symbol[, args...]) ⇒ Object #__send__(symbol[, args...]) ⇒ Object

Invokes the method identified by symbol, passing it any arguments specified. You can use __send__ if the name send clashes with an existing method in obj.

class Klass
  def hello(*args)
    "Hello " + args.join(' ')
  end
end
k = Klass.new
k.send :hello, "gentle", "readers"   #=> "Hello gentle readers"


# File 'vm_eval.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj.send(symbol [, args...])        -> obj
 *     obj.__send__(symbol [, args...])      -> obj
 *
 *  Invokes the method identified by _symbol_, passing it any
 *  arguments specified. You can use <code>__send__</code> if the name
 *  +send+ clashes with an existing method in _obj_.
 *
 *     class Klass
 *       def hello(*args)
 *         "Hello " + args.join(' ')
 *       end
 *     end
 *     k = Klass.new
 *     k.send :hello, "gentle", "readers"   #=> "Hello gentle readers"
 */

VALUE
rb_f_send(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE recv)
{
    return send_internal(argc, argv, recv, CALL_FCALL);
}

#==(other) ⇒ Boolean #equal?(other) ⇒ Boolean #eql?(other) ⇒ Boolean

Equality---At the Object level, == returns true only if obj and other are the same object. Typically, this method is overridden in descendant classes to provide class-specific meaning.

Unlike ==, the equal? method should never be overridden by subclasses: it is used to determine object identity (that is, a.equal?(b) iff a is the same object as b).

The eql? method returns true if obj and anObject have the same value. Used by Hash to test members for equality. For objects of class Object, eql? is synonymous with ==. Subclasses normally continue this tradition, but there are exceptions. Numeric types, for example, perform type conversion across ==, but not across eql?, so:

1 == 1.0     #=> true
1.eql? 1.0   #=> false


# File 'object.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj == other        -> true or false
 *     obj.equal?(other)   -> true or false
 *     obj.eql?(other)     -> true or false
 *
 *  Equality---At the <code>Object</code> level, <code>==</code> returns
 *  <code>true</code> only if <i>obj</i> and <i>other</i> are the
 *  same object. Typically, this method is overridden in descendant
 *  classes to provide class-specific meaning.
 *
 *  Unlike <code>==</code>, the <code>equal?</code> method should never be
 *  overridden by subclasses: it is used to determine object identity
 *  (that is, <code>a.equal?(b)</code> iff <code>a</code> is the same
 *  object as <code>b</code>).
 *
 *  The <code>eql?</code> method returns <code>true</code> if
 *  <i>obj</i> and <i>anObject</i> have the same value. Used by
 *  <code>Hash</code> to test members for equality.  For objects of
 *  class <code>Object</code>, <code>eql?</code> is synonymous with
 *  <code>==</code>. Subclasses normally continue this tradition, but
 *  there are exceptions. <code>Numeric</code> types, for example,
 *  perform type conversion across <code>==</code>, but not across
 *  <code>eql?</code>, so:
 *
 *     1 == 1.0     #=> true
 *     1.eql? 1.0   #=> false
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_equal(VALUE obj1, VALUE obj2)
{
    if (obj1 == obj2) return Qtrue;
    return Qfalse;
}

#instance_eval(string[, filename [, lineno]]) ⇒ Object #instance_eval {|| ... } ⇒ Object

Evaluates a string containing Ruby source code, or the given block, within the context of the receiver (obj). In order to set the context, the variable self is set to obj while the code is executing, giving the code access to obj's instance variables. In the version of instance_eval that takes a String, the optional second and third parameters supply a filename and starting line number that are used when reporting compilation errors.

class KlassWithSecret
  def initialize
    @secret = 99
  end
end
k = KlassWithSecret.new
k.instance_eval { @secret }   #=> 99

Overloads:

  • #instance_eval {|| ... } ⇒ Object

    Yields:

    • ()


# File 'vm_eval.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj.instance_eval(string [, filename [, lineno]] )   -> obj
 *     obj.instance_eval {| | block }                       -> obj
 *
 *  Evaluates a string containing Ruby source code, or the given block,
 *  within the context of the receiver (_obj_). In order to set the
 *  context, the variable +self+ is set to _obj_ while
 *  the code is executing, giving the code access to _obj_'s
 *  instance variables. In the version of <code>instance_eval</code>
 *  that takes a +String+, the optional second and third
 *  parameters supply a filename and starting line number that are used
 *  when reporting compilation errors.
 *
 *     class KlassWithSecret
 *       def initialize
 *         @secret = 99
 *       end
 *     end
 *     k = KlassWithSecret.new
 *     k.instance_eval { @secret }   #=> 99
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_instance_eval(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE self)
{
    VALUE klass;

    if (SPECIAL_CONST_P(self)) {
    klass = Qnil;
    }
    else {
    klass = rb_singleton_class(self);
    }
    return specific_eval(argc, argv, klass, self);
}

#instance_exec(arg...) {|var...| ... } ⇒ Object

Executes the given block within the context of the receiver (obj). In order to set the context, the variable self is set to obj while the code is executing, giving the code access to obj's instance variables. Arguments are passed as block parameters.

class KlassWithSecret
  def initialize
    @secret = 99
  end
end
k = KlassWithSecret.new
k.instance_exec(5) {|x| @secret+x }   #=> 104

Yields:

  • (var...)


# File 'vm_eval.c'

/*
 *  call-seq:
 *     obj.instance_exec(arg...) {|var...| block }                       -> obj
 *
 *  Executes the given block within the context of the receiver
 *  (_obj_). In order to set the context, the variable +self+ is set
 *  to _obj_ while the code is executing, giving the code access to
 *  _obj_'s instance variables.  Arguments are passed as block parameters.
 *
 *     class KlassWithSecret
 *       def initialize
 *         @secret = 99
 *       end
 *     end
 *     k = KlassWithSecret.new
 *     k.instance_exec(5) {|x| @secret+x }   #=> 104
 */

VALUE
rb_obj_instance_exec(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE self)
{
    VALUE klass;

    if (SPECIAL_CONST_P(self)) {
    klass = Qnil;
    }
    else {
    klass = rb_singleton_class(self);
    }
    return yield_under(klass, self, rb_ary_new4(argc, argv));
}

#singleton_method_added(symbol) ⇒ Object

Invoked as a callback whenever a singleton method is added to the receiver.

module Chatty
  def Chatty.singleton_method_added(id)
    puts "Adding #{id.id2name}"
  end
  def self.one()     end
  def two()          end
  def Chatty.three() end
end

produces:

Adding singleton_method_added
Adding one
Adding three


# File 'object.c'

/*
 * Not documented
 */

static VALUE
rb_obj_dummy(void)
{
    return Qnil;
}

#singleton_method_removed(symbol) ⇒ Object

Invoked as a callback whenever a singleton method is removed from the receiver.

module Chatty
  def Chatty.singleton_method_removed(id)
    puts "Removing #{id.id2name}"
  end
  def self.one()     end
  def two()          end
  def Chatty.three() end
  class << self
    remove_method :three
    remove_method :one
  end
end

produces:

Removing three
Removing one


# File 'object.c'

/*
 * Not documented
 */

static VALUE
rb_obj_dummy(void)
{
    return Qnil;
}

#singleton_method_undefined(symbol) ⇒ Object

Invoked as a callback whenever a singleton method is undefined in the receiver.

module Chatty
  def Chatty.singleton_method_undefined(id)
    puts "Undefining #{id.id2name}"
  end
  def Chatty.one()   end
  class << self
     undef_method(:one)
  end
end

produces:

Undefining one


# File 'object.c'

/*
 * Not documented
 */

static VALUE
rb_obj_dummy(void)
{
    return Qnil;
}