Class: Pry::InputLock

Inherits:
Object show all
Defined in:
lib/pry/input_lock.rb

Overview

There is one InputLock per input (such as STDIN) as two REPLs on the same input makes things delirious. InputLock serializes accesses to the input so that threads to not conflict with each other. The latest thread to request ownership of the input wins.

Defined Under Namespace

Classes: Interrupt

Class Attribute Summary collapse

Class Method Summary collapse

Instance Method Summary collapse

Constructor Details

#initializeInputLock



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 29

def initialize
  @mutex = Mutex.new
  @cond = ConditionVariable.new
  @owners = []
  @interruptible = false
end

Class Attribute Details

.global_lockObject

Returns the value of attribute global_lock



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 13

def global_lock
  @global_lock
end

.input_locksObject

Returns the value of attribute input_locks



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 12

def input_locks
  @input_locks
end

Class Method Details

.for(input) ⇒ Object



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 19

def self.for(input)
  # XXX This method leaks memory, as we never unregister an input once we
  # are done with it. Fortunately, the leak is tiny (or so we hope).  In
  # usual scenarios, we would leak the StringIO that is passed to be
  # evaluated from the command line.
  global_lock.synchronize do
    input_locks[input] ||= Pry::InputLock.new
  end
end

Instance Method Details

#__with_ownership(&block) ⇒ Object

Adds ourselves to the ownership list. The last one in the list may access the input through interruptible_region().



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 38

def __with_ownership(&block)
  @mutex.synchronize do
    # Three cases:
    # 1) There are no owners, in this case we are good to go.
    # 2) The current owner of the input is not reading the input (it might
    #    just be evaluating some ruby that the user typed).
    #    The current owner will figure out that it cannot go back to reading
    #    the input since we are adding ourselves to the @owners list, which
    #    in turns makes us the current owner.
    # 3) The owner of the input is in the interruptible region, reading from
    #    the input. It's safe to send an Interrupt exception to interrupt
    #    the owner. It will then proceed like in case 2).
    #    We wait until the owner sets the interruptible flag back
    #    to false, meaning that he's out of the interruptible region.
    #    Note that the owner may receive multiple interrupts since, but that
    #    should be okay (and trying to avoid it is futile anyway).
    while @interruptible
      @owners.last.raise Interrupt
      @cond.wait(@mutex)
    end
    @owners << Thread.current
  end

  block.call

ensure
  @mutex.synchronize do
    # We are releasing any desire to have the input ownership by removing
    # ourselves from the list.
    @owners.delete(Thread.current)

    # We need to wake up the thread at the end of the @owners list, but
    # sadly Ruby doesn't allow us to choose which one we wake up, so we wake
    # them all up.
    @cond.broadcast
  end
end

#enter_interruptible_regionObject



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 82

def enter_interruptible_region
  @mutex.synchronize do
    # We patiently wait until we are the owner. This may happen as another
    # thread calls with_ownership() because of a binding.pry happening in
    # another thread.
    @cond.wait(@mutex) until @owners.last == Thread.current

    # We are the legitimate owner of the input. We mark ourselves as
    # interruptible, so other threads can send us an Interrupt exception
    # while we are blocking from reading the input.
    @interruptible = true
  end
end

#interruptible_region(&block) ⇒ Object



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 109

def interruptible_region(&block)
  enter_interruptible_region

  # XXX Note that there is a chance that we get the interrupt right after
  # the readline call succeeded, but we'll never know, and we will retry the
  # call, discarding that piece of input.
  block.call

rescue Interrupt
  # We were asked to back off. The one requesting the interrupt will be
  # waiting on the conditional for the interruptible flag to change to false.
  # Note that there can be some inefficiency, as we could immediately
  # succeed in enter_interruptible_region(), even before the one requesting
  # the ownership has the chance to register itself as an owner.
  # To mitigate the issue, we sleep a little bit.
  leave_interruptible_region
  sleep 0.01
  retry

ensure
  leave_interruptible_region
end

#leave_interruptible_regionObject



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 96

def leave_interruptible_region
  @mutex.synchronize do
    # We check if we are still the owner, because we could have received an
    # Interrupt right after the following @cond.broadcast, making us retry.
    @interruptible = false if @owners.last == Thread.current
    @cond.broadcast
  end
rescue Interrupt
  # We need to guard against a spurious interrupt delivered while we are
  # trying to acquire the lock (the rescue block is no longer in our scope).
  retry
end

#with_ownership(&block) ⇒ Object



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# File 'lib/pry/input_lock.rb', line 76

def with_ownership(&block)
  # If we are in a nested with_ownership() call (nested pry context), we do nothing.
  nested = @mutex.synchronize { @owners.include?(Thread.current) }
  nested ? block.call : __with_ownership(&block)
end