Workpattern Build Status

What?

Simple addition and subtraction of minutes on dates taking account of real-life working and resting periods.

So What?

The core Ruby classes that represent date and time allow calculations by adding a duration such as days or minutes to a date and returning the new Date or DateTime as the result. Although there are 60 seconds in every minute and 60 minutes in every hour, there aren't always 24 hours in every day, and if there was, we still wouldn't be working during all of them. We would be doing other things like eating, sleeping, travelling and having a bit of leisure time. Workpattern refers to this time as Resting time. It refers to the time when we're busy doing stuff as Working time.

When it comes to scheduling work, whether part of a project, teachers in a classroom or even bed availability in a hospital, the working day can have anything from 0 hours to the full 24 hours. Most office based work is something like 7.5 or 8 hours a day except weekends, public holidays and vacations when no work takes place.

The Workpattern library was born to allow date related calculations to take into account real life working and resting times. It gets told about working and resting periods and can then perform calculations on a given date. It can add and subtract a number of minutes, calculate the working minutes between two dates and say whether a specific minute is working or resting.

This gem has the potential to serve as the engine for scheduling algorithms that are the core of products such as Microsoft Project and Oracle Primavera P6 as well as other applications that need to know when they can perform work and when they can’t.

Install

sudo gem install workpattern

Getting Started

The first step is to create a Workpattern to hold all the working and resting times. I'll start in 2011 and let it run for 10 years.

mywp=Workpattern.new('My Workpattern',2011,10)

My Workpattern will be created as a 24 hour a day full working time. Now it has to be told about the resting periods. First the weekends.

mywp.resting(:days => :weekend)

then the days in the week have specific working and resting times using the Workpattern.clock method, although anything that responds to #hour and #min methods will do ...

mywp.resting(:days =>:weekday, :from_time=>Workpattern.clock(0,0),:to_time=>Workpattern.clock(8,59))
mywp.resting(:days =>:weekday, :from_time=>Workpattern.clock(12,0),:to_time=>Workpattern.clock(12,59))
mywp.resting(:days =>:weekday, :from_time=>Workpattern.clock(18,0),:to_time=>Workpattern.clock(23,59))

Now we have the working and resting periods setup we can just add 32 hours as minutes (1920) to our date.

mydate=DateTime.civil(2011,9,1,9,0)
result_date = mywp.calc(mydate,1920) # => 6/9/11@18:00

Development

  • Source hosted on GitHub.
  • Direct questions and discussions to the mailing list.
  • Report issues on GitHub Issues.
  • Pull requests are very welcome, however I have never participated in Open Source so will be a bit slow as I am learning. Please be patient with me. Please include spec and/or feature coverage for every patch, and create a topic branch for every separate change you make.
  • Advice, such as pointing out how I should really code in Ruby will be gratefully received.

Things To Do

In its current form this library is being made available to see if there is any interest in using it. At the moment it can perform the following:

  • define the working and resting minutes for any 24 hour day
  • given a date it can return the resulting date after adding or subtracting a number of minutes
  • calculate the number of working minutes between two dates
  • report whether a specific minute in time is working or resting

This is what I consider to be the basics, but there are a number of functional and non-functial areas I would like to address in a future version.

Functional

  • Merge two Workpatterns together to create a new one allowing either resting or working to take precedence
  • Given a date, find the next working or resting minute either before or after it.
  • Handle both 23 and 25 hour days that occur when the clocks change.
  • Extract patterns from the workpattern so they can be persisted in a database.
  • Decide how to handle different Timezones apart from UTC.

Non-Functional

  • Improve the documentation and introduce real world use as an example
  • Improve my ability to write Ruby code

License

(The MIT License)

Copyright (c) 2012

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the 'Software'), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS', WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.